Wednesday, October 01, 2008

When the bombing stopped, we fled Darfur

A move by the Sudanese government to bomb a region in Darfur thought to be a rebel stronghold has resulted in the deaths and mass displacement of thousands of civilians on the ground. When a shell hit her house in July this year Zenaba pulled her children out of the burning rubble and carried them to the Chad border, where they are still struggling to rebuild their lives

I was in the house with all my children when the bomb hit, injuring me and three of my six children. It was a Friday. The plane came over in the afternoon. First we heard the sound of the plane arriving and then – it was so fast – the bombs. My brother-in-law says that six bombs were dropped. Read more >>>>>>>>>>>>>

2 comments:

James said...

THIS IS HORRIBLE!!!
I have been following the news story in class and find it horrifying that actions like these are being allowed to happen in Darfur. I am sicked when I heard that there has not been any international support and that the United Nations is still waiting for more information to conclude that the actions that are going on in Darfur are in fact a genocide. From what I've heard on the BBC news and countless other sources, and even now the Darfur Daily News I'm absoloutly enraged that nobody is doing anything to help. I mean by the time we have proof that the genocide is happening it will be far too late.

-Rob

MatthewM said...

The way that the Sudanese government operates is outrageous. Bombing innocent civilians without verifying information to make sure that their targets were rebels then trying to rationalize the mistake by saying “Oops, we thought you were rebels”, is unbelievable. I feel sorry for those trapped within this conflict. At the same time, I am amazed at how strong the citizens of Sudan are. I would not last a day in Darfur, and yet, most Sudanese are able to continue the fight for survival every day and still manage to smile for the cameras. I hope that one day the Sudanese government is dismantled and replaced by one that values human lives.


Matthew McLinden